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Guv Bullock Qualifies for 2nd Dem Prez Debate, Immediately a Contender and It’s Time to Respect His Decision. Biden, Yang, Delaney Running in Wrong Primary

According to his campaign and tweeted out by veteran Montana political reporter Mike Dennison, Montana Governor Steve Bullock has qualified for the second Democratic Presidential debate.

See this tweet:

As Montanans we should be proud of our Governor, the first Montanan to run for President is awesome. He’s got a great resume too, as I may have previously mentioned a few times.

On that note, it is time to respect his decision to run for President, and move on. I made the personal choice to respect whatever decision Governor Bullock made, as it is his life, not mine, and I recommend you do the same.

We aren’t going to get anywhere with this constant bickering and in-fighting in our state and from DC folks who want to control Montana politics. Get over it, he’s running for President. Wilmot Collins, Mayor of Helena, is running for Senate.

I am not interested in talking about who I want to be the nominee as 20+ candidates is absurd and frankly stupid, I don’t know much about many of these folks and if I don’t know them how do they expect to have the name recognition to win? On this count it is time for Tim Ryan and Seth Moulton to go away. Who are you? Who cares!

Until this field gets to a reasonable number, like 8 or 10 candidates, at most, it is really hard to speak about anyone actually winning the nomination on the first ballot. That raises many other concerns that I will raise at a later date.

While the field is crowded and noisy I just want a debate on policies that we can build a platform on to win. It is important that we unify around some very powerful policies and create movements to make sure we pass these policies in 2021, regardless of the nominee.

I do like Elizabeth Warren, Governor Bullock, Bernie Sanders and Julian Castro as the race gets underway, but only because I have seen results I like from them in the past(Bullock) and visions for the future(Warren). I will be excited to see where Governor Bullock goes with his policy proposals during this primary.

On that note, here is Elizabeth Warren delivering some profound remarks on some important issues and showing exactly what true leadership is:

I’ll echo Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez that it is time for several candidates to “sashay away” from the primary. She was directly mentioning dunderhead John Delaney, who was booed at the California Democratic Convention for rudely and inappropriately attacking the partywide view that all Americans deserve healthcare.

I would say it is time for Joe Biden and Andrew Yang to “sashay away” as well. I have made my case against my former boss, Joe Biden, here.

His Iraq War vote is disqualifying in a Democratic Primary and voting for the Iraq War has also proven disqualifying to American voters as they rejected Democratic Presidential candidates in 2004 and 2016 who had voted for the Iraq War. Give it up Joe, time to go!

Andrew Yang was a candidate that many have not heard of and if they have then they were influenced by his hard internet push and use of memes and hashtags like #YangGang to amplify his stance on a Universal Basic Income. He was offering every American $1000 a month as UBI, but sadly he exposed himself as another creepy Silicon Valley millionaire libertarian who was using the allure of UBI as a trojan horse to gut other social programs.

It is time for Yang, Biden and Delaney to jump out of the Democratic Primary into the proper primary with these stances.

Pete Buttigieg is also an interesting candidate, a mayor of a town of 100,000, South Bend, Indiana. He is widely unknown and as research comes out about him, some views may change. See this article: All About Pete

If you know only one thing about Pete Buttigieg, it’s that he’s The Small-Town Mayor Who Is Making A Splash. If you know half a dozen things about Pete Buttigieg, it’s that he’s also young, gay, a Rhodes Scholar, an Arabic-speaking polyglot, and an Afghanistan veteran. If you know anything more than that about Pete Buttigieg, you probably live in South Bend, Indiana. This is a little strange: These are all facts about him, but they don’t tell us much about what he believes or what he advocates. The nationwide attention to Buttigieg seems more to be due to “the fact that he is a highly-credentialed Rust Belt mayor” rather than “what he has actually said and done.” He’s a gay millennial from Indiana, yes. But should he be President of the United States?

When he is asked about what his actual policies are, Buttigieg has often been evasive.

Analysis of Pete Buttigieg’s stance on the Iraq War from his autobiography:

When it comes to Iraq, though, he says something odd. Buttigieg takes pride in the fact that at a rally outside Harvard’s Science Center, he argued that the Iraq War did not meet the criteria for a “necessary war,” though he was convinced Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction. After Iraq collapsed into “chaos,” he concludes, “we who were against the invasion had been wrong about the weapons, but right about the war. The administration had been wrong about both.” Hang on a minute, though: Plenty of people who were against the invasion had pointed out that the Bush administration was pulling the wool over the country’s eyes. UN weapons inspector Scott Ritter was a persistent voice insisting that Hussein’s supposed weapons stockpile was no more. It’s odd for Buttigieg to tar other protesters with his own credulity.

That’s a minor point. A more significant one is the way he talks about war. Buttigieg’s thesis was in part about Vietnam, which he calls a “doomed errand into the jungle.” The liberal vocabulary on wars like Vietnam and Iraq should trouble us. It says things like “doomed” and “mistaken,” (“a lethal blunder” that “collapsed into chaos,” to quote Buttigieg) its judgments pragmatic rather than moral. In doing so, it fails to reckon with the full scale of the atrocities brought about by U.S. government policy.

It also treats America as an innocent blundering giant with “the best of intentions.” Buttigieg quotes Graham Greene: “Innocence is like a dumb leper that has lost his bell, wandering the world, meaning no harm.” This is the Ken Burns line: We mean so well but we make terrible mistakes. It excludes the possibility that American leaders know full well what they are doing but simply do not care about the lives of non-Americans. And, in fact, it implicitly accepts the devaluation of non-American lives. Discussing the dissolution of Iraq into “chaos” (note: a word that obscures culpability), Buttigieg writes of “a reality on the ground that could no longer be denied amid rising American body count.” The Iraqi body count (over 500,000) is unmentioned, just as he leaves out the Vietnamese body count (in the millions). The phrase “reality on the ground” is used without any discussion of what that reality was for those who actually lived on the ground.

Tulsi Gabbard is an interesting candidate when it comes to foreign policy, but of late some questions have been raised and concerns as well: Tulsi Gabbard in New York Magazine

“We share a deep love,” Tulsi says to a standing-room-only crowd of 200. She talks about love a lot in a way that might have provoked eye rolls pre-Trump but now just sounds appealingly weird. A Hindu veteran and millennial congresswoman of Samoan descent hailing from Hawaii, she brings together disparate constituencies: most noticeably, Bernie Sanders fans who love that she resigned from the Democratic National Committee to endorse him in 2016, but also libertarians who appreciate her noninterventionism, Indian-Americans taken by her professed Hinduism, veterans attracted to her credibility on issues of war and peace, and racists who interpret various statements she has made to be promising indications of Islamophobia. That she is polling at one percent, sandwiched between Andrew Yang and Amy Klobuchar, suggests that bringing together these constituencies is not nearly enough, but the intensity of emotion she provokes on all sides sets her apart.

Also, Beto O’Rourke should probably run for Senate too, he should finish the job he started in 2018 and win a Texas Senate seat. Beto O’Rourke from Texas Tribune:

It was not long after O’Rourke emerged as a potential presidential candidate late last year that questions about his political identity came into sharp relief. They were mostly confined to social media and a few opinion pieces, but there were several common threads: his less-than-ironclad support for things like Medicare for All and tuition-free college – two of the most prominent issues advocated by an increasingly vocal left wing of the party, his membership in Congress in the centrist New Democratic Coalition and not the Congressional Progressive Caucus, the amount of campaign contributions he got from oil and gas executives in a state dominated by the industry. Analyses of his voting record in the House highlighted how at times he voted with Republicans despite representing one of the bluest districts in the country.

Final point, get to work for a candidate, fight back against local bad actors, Greg Gianforte or Steve Daines, and stop debating fascists, we need to build a progressive platform, unite and win, arguing with those who would put children in cages is not worth the breath, makes calls and knock doors instead, attend a community meeting, fight back and win.

If you appreciate an independent voice holding Montana politicians accountable and informing voters, and you can throw a few dollars a month our way, we would certainly appreciate it.

About the author

Nathan Kosted

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  • Haha! I’m over Bullock deciding to run for president — as are the vast majority of humans in this gawd-forsaken country and planet. If he was at all serious about taking a role in the upcoming deliberations about the future of this country or this planet, he’d be vying for a seat in the US senate — something that is possible. Rather than inflating his resume. He’s simply proving to the majority of us that he’s as full of crap as the next neoliberal con job.

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