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The Story of Another Soldier Lost in Iraq

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It’s rare that I find myself moved by anything Christopher Hitchens has written, but this story, about a soldier killed in Iraq who had been motivated in part by Hitchens to enlist, is incredibly powerful.

My idea had been to quote from the last scene of Macbeth, which is the only passage I know that can hope to rise to such an occasion. The tyrant and usurper has been killed, but Ross has to tell old Siward that his boy has perished in the struggle:

Your son, my lord, has paid a soldier’s debt;
He only lived but till he was a man;
The which no sooner had his prowess confirm’d
In the unshrinking station where he fought,
But like a man he died.

This being Shakespeare, the truly emotional and understated moment follows a beat or two later, when Ross adds:

Your cause of sorrow
Must not be measured by his worth, for then

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