Breaking: Kathleen Williams Is Leading Greg Gianforte!

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In a poll of Montana voters conducted by Gravis Marketing, Kathleen Williams is leading Congressman Greg Gianforte 49-43 as their race begins, hardly an auspicious beginning for Gianforte in his bid for re-election and perhaps a sign that he damaged his reputation badly enough with his assault that he could be quite vulnerable this fall.

The poll, conducted between June 11-June 13, also shows Senator Tester leading Mat Rosendale by a margin of 51-44.

What’s most interesting about the poll, though, is that it captured a conservative-leaning audience. Almost half of its respondents believe the investigation into Russian meddling is politically motivated and 38% of respondents identified as Republicans, compared to only 28% Democrats.

All the usual caveats about polling apply here, of course, but it’s certainly got to be disconcerting to the people working the Gianforte campaign to see poll results confirming what seems obvious: Gianforte, never terribly well-liked among Republicans to begin with and certainly damaged by his behavior the night before the special election, will struggle once again to connect with Montana voters.

It’s also quite likely that Gianforte is warming up his checkbook to pay for millions of dollars of false ads to prop his electoral chances this fall after seeing these results.

Seems like no better time to chip in to support Kathleen Williams and show the nation that small Montana donations can compete with the resources of a deeply unpopular millionaire who lacks the decency or courage to face his constituents.

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About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is an eighteen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it's a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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