Montana Politics Ryan Zinke

How Could Anyone Trust Ryan Zinke on Public Lands?

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Given his flip flops on abortion, gun control, education, conservation, energy policy, and almost every other question facing the state of Montana, it shouldn’t be surprising that Ryan Zinke doesn’t get why Montanans don’t trust him on public lands. This Missoulian story makes it clear why they shouldn’t:

Lewis has hit hard on the issue of transferring federally-managed public lands to the state in part because Zinke signed a pledge two years ago that included the idea and because the state’s Republican party has added it to their platform.
“There’s a lot of bad ideas going around and this is the worst,” Lewis said, adding that he supports further protection for public lands.
Zinke has said he no longer believes in transferring lands to the state and wants to make sure public lands are well-managed. He also wants to require that local governments have a say in their management.

Of course, now that the press is finally reporting on the crackpot pledge Zinke signed two years ago, and covered by blogs since then, they might as well include some of the other details Zinke signed off on—and see whether he “no longer believes” them, like the idea that:

  • our Federal Government is acting like a monarchy
  • The citizens of Montana “have the exclusive right of governing themselves as a free, sovereign, and independent state.”
  • The U.N. sponsored International Baccalaureate World Schools, which promotes secularism and European-style socialism, has already penetrated Montana public schools
  •  if left unchecked, the current lawless trajectory of our nation and our State will ultimately
    result in the dissolution of our Constitutional Republic, and will consign the great experiment of
    America?s freedom to the dust-bin of history.

I’d say it’s a newsworthy question to find out if a candidate for Montana’s sole Congressional seat still believes those ideas. The Montana press has had two full years to vet this candidate and they’ve  barely scratched the surface on his dishonesty and inconsistency.

As a voter, if you care about Montana’s public lands, how can you support a candidate who two years ago signed a pledge that would, if enacted, necessitate selling Montana’s public lands to the highest bidder, even if he says he’s changed his mind now?

 

 

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About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is an eighteen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it's a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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