Montana Politics US Politics

A Sellout’s Manifesto Or How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Party

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Let me begin by positing a radical thesis: the act of supporting a Democratic candidate, even one who occasionally disappoints, or the act of questioning an element of progressive orthodoxy (a fascinating concept) does not make a person a corporate tool or party shill. In fact, today,choosing to support the Democratic Party is the best way to protect our tenuous hold on many of the progressive values and policies we hold dear.

Personally, my political consciousness was developed through reading people like Michael Harrington, Norman Thomas and Eugene Debs. The pretentious sounding name of this site, of course, comes from one of Debs’s speeches. The world these three and others passionately advocated for—a world with improved economic, social, and environmental justice—shaped my worldview about politics and human obligation. I still turn to them for inspiration in a time when many of the policies they fought for are under sustained attack.

In short, I am deeply committed to economic justice and believe that we should stop pathologizing poverty and start solving it. I believe in civil rights for all humans, regardless of sexual orientation, sex, or place of birth. I believe that we should live in a country that should use diplomacy rather than violence to solve international crises. I believe that we need to make serious personal and policy changes to better protect our environment.

And the Democratic Party often lets me down on these beliefs.

Why then do I support Democrats who occasionally disappoint, even on critically important issues? Why do I generally support a party that is often far to the right of my own positions? Because in today’s political climate, on many important national and local questions, they represent the last bulwark to protect rights gained and advances made in the past 100 years. Because real human beings will suffer greatly if we further empower a Republican Party so divorced from rationality and human ethics that it would destroy a program which provides economic and health security for our elderly, legally define our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters as second class citizens, and accelerate the damage being done to our environment.

We progressives often talk about the importance of confronting privilege. Many of us on the left have the privilege of taking all or nothing positions on political questions because we will survive the fallout: our jobs, our rights, and our positions will be secure no matter which party takes power. In fact, perversely, some of us will even see our prestige and status increased the worse our government behaves.

I’m not so certain that the truly voiceless, the powerless, and the poor have that privilege. While I may have a position privileged enough to endure Republican rule, I believe that the truly powerless are much better served by a Democratic Party who will, co-opted as they may be, fight for them and the programs which offer them a decent standard of living.

Just ask poor students who rely on free and reduced lunch how important the Democratic Party is. Or young people who need loans to attend college. Or women who need access to basic healthcare services. Or the elderly who need to see a doctor.

Does the Democratic Party move too slowly and too cautiously in the defense of progressive values? Does it even occasionally move against those goals? Certainly—and it’s frustrating when they do it. Should progressives fight tooth and nail to drive the party back to its roots of protecting the worker, the Constitution, and a sense of economic justice? Absolutely.

But that progressives are seriously discussing working against, or even voting against Democrats, at a time when basic economic rights and the future of the country are at stake, absolutely baffles me.

Ideological purity feels wonderful, but it won’t feed a child who needs better nutrition to learn.

After a long and circuitous political road (one perhaps as long as this post), I’ve come to realize that I am proud to be a Democrat. I’m proud of a Party that saved the United States during the Depression, which gave economic security to the elderly and poor, which made the dream of civil rights for all much closer to being realized, and which not only put the environment on the table for discussion, but took concrete steps to protect it.

Given the realities of our political system, my choice is pretty clear: to simultaneously support the party that best protects progressive values while working to improve it.

I’m proud to make that choice.

About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is a eighteen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it’s a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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  • I am coming to the realization that not all progressives are left or Democrat. There have  been many “progressive” Republicans too. While I agree that the Democratic Party – right now – is more progressive the mainstream Republican party, it doesn’t mean that there are no progressives on the right. To be progressive, you have to be willing to move forward (not be static or worse, regressive). Sadly, much of the Republican Party has chosen to be regressive. Reagan did some great things as President but he is also the “father” of the regressive movement with Conservatives. Now I see the left beginning to embrace the same Regressive ideas – usually from the standpoint of “Idiological Purity”. For the sake of all Americans, you guys simply can’t do that. It is hard enough trying to get my fellow conservatives to see that stagnant and regressive stances are bad for our Country. We conservatives seem to fight change tooth and nail. It is depressing to me to see this happening on the other side of the fence – even if most of the blame can be laid at the feet of the modern Conservatives.

    • That’s certainly true–or at least it was. When you realize, as you pointed out on the other thread–that Nixon signed environmental legislation into law, it shows just how far right the conversation and policy have drifted.

  • Just be aware, Pogie.  “More and better Democrats” (emphasis on the better) is a good and healthy thing, but that mantra  has earned me a great deal of ire from those who believe that principles feed kids or save jobs.  As the post below should show you, many who see themselves as the ‘really real’ progressives are vastly more interested in their role in progress than they are in whether or not progress is being made.  If there is a disagreement it is this:  Some believe that progress comes from undermining our government.  Those progressives join the ranks of such progressive stalwarts as Ron Paul, Michelle Bachman and Grover Norquist.  In truth, coming to grips with that has been very bitter for me; that realization has taught me to scorn those who actively work against the success of principles I hold dear while claiming that I’m the one who’s “sold out”.  Perhaps they think I can’t see them behind the Overton window.  The fact is, they make certain that everybody sees them, and that might be part of the problem.

      • I would do so only privately.  My email is not hard to find.  And if you share anything I write to you in private with the greater online community then I will bust your balls as much I try to with Matthew.  That might be your clue to an answer right there.  He’s a loathsome little self-promoter.

    • Here’s what bugs me – I read posts like this and look for substance. There are only meaningless generalities like “feed kids and save jobs”‘ as if that is what the debate is about. But it’s too general, and so has no meaning. It is clear that you are credulous to a fault, falling for transparent political theater (‘as in believing that Obama extended the Bush tax cuts to save unemployment benefits).

      Then you do what you normally do, reflect everything back on the grandiose vision you have of yourself, part of the condition. You hold no principles dear that I see, have no great integrity to defend. You’re a bit like Ed Schultz, the guy who decided he was a Democrat when the right wing radio slot in Fargo was taken. What you appear to be is an opportunist, but it’s weird in that you’re a no one going nowhere.

      Nonetheless, I easily see through you. You got nuthin’.

      It’s “Bachmann.”

  • Wow!  Best thing I’ve read in a long time.  You’ve got a gift, dude.  And just how does a person become a great writer?  Well, I’ll share the best advice I’ve ever heard.  To be a great writer, one needs to read a lot, write a lot, and think a lot.  Pogie, that’s you, dude!  Oh, and one other thing that I would personally add that list.  One needs to LIVE a lot.  You see, when you’re in the trenches, ie. with hungry kids trying to learn, that IS living a lot! Dancing on the guv’s table is not. Great read, Pogue!

  • Thanks for this! I hate getting bashed for trying to make change from the inside and for being strategic. Appreciate your standing up and saying what I have wanted to for some time.

  • choosing to support the Democratic Party is the best way to protect our tenuous hold on many of the progressive values and policies we hold dear.

    what bugs me about your manifesto, Don, is how you are trying to elevate yourself as being in a better position to voice criticism of the party you “love” than those you disagree with (more in terms of style and tone than content).the figurative head of the party you love, who you recently criticized for potentially offering up the sacred cow of SS to the alter of corporate greed, has spent the the entirety of his term spitting in the faces of progressives.so i have to ask:  how is choosing to support Obama in the next election going protect us from imperial overreach?  from corporate malfeasance?  from the destruction of habeas corpus and judicial due process? from the erosion of our civil liberties? from the environmental degradation of laxly regulated extractive industries?

    “Intelligent discontent is the mainspring of civilization. Progress is born of agitation. It is agitation or stagnation.”—Eugene Debs

    so this is the quote you took the title of your blog from.  interesting, considering your recent ridicule of the EF protestors.  did you think of this quote as you choked on patchouli and worried more about alleged littering than a tar sands pipeline?

    Why do I generally support a party that is often far to the right of my own positions? Because in today’s political climate, on many important national and local questions, they represent the last bulwark to protect rights gained and advances made in the past 100 years. Because real human beings will suffer greatly if we further empower a Republican Party so divorced from rationality and human ethics that it would destroy a program which provides economic and health security for our elderly, legally define our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters as second class citizens, and accelerate the damage being done to our environment.

    this is really mediocre generalizing.  yes, real human beings suffer every day.  and whistleblowers trying to make things better are less safe under a big D prez.  and illegal immigrants are being deported faster than ever, even if Obama has to send them back to the ravaged hell of Haiti.  and Bradley Manning is being tortured.  and war continues to spread (Scahill on Somalia is a depressing read).

    i don’t know how anyone can love a party that produces these results.

    Does the Democratic Party move too slowly and too cautiously in the defense of progressive values? Does it even occasionally move against those goals? Certainly—and it’s frustrating when they do it. Should progressives fight tooth and nail to drive the party back to its roots of protecting the worker, the Constitution, and a sense of economic justice? Absolutely.

    But that progressives are seriously discussing working against, or even voting against Democrats, at a time when basic economic rights and the future of the country are at stake, absolutely baffles me.

    you shouldn’t be baffled.  when the rhetoric (lies) of campaigning consistently turn into politicians doing the exact opposite, well, big surprise, people begin to stop believing their bullshit, because they are liars.  And please note, it’s not the fault of the people who point out the lies; it’s the liars.

    • I just don’t think we’re going to be able to agree–and that’s fine. I’ve got more faith than you that the Democratic Party better protects things that are important to me than you do. I think the Democratic Party is responsible for most of the major reforms to improve the US in the past 100 years in the US.

      You can’t see that. That’s fine. 

      Would it be too much to ask, though, that you not always feel it’s a better choice to attack the person than the argument? Really? You’re suggesting that I am elevating myself “as being in a better position to voice criticism” because I have the temerity to have my own opinion. Can’t I just want to write what’s on my mind?

      As for my “mediocre generalizing,” go read something else.

      Read over some of your posts and comments from the past few months. Do you feel like you might occasionally elevate yourself about the people you disagree with?

      Crazy idea. There’s a wide range of opinion on any number of issues that divide the Left. Might it not be a more persuasive approach to just step off a bit and have discourse?

      • the title of this post appears to frame you as being the victim of an unfair characterization of you being a sellout, which you then try to counter.

        sorry if i don’t see you as a victim, but a willing participant in the corrosive discourse you are trying to elevate yourself above.

        i try and do the same thing (elevate my posts above this crap), and often fail.  i’ve learned no one is above the bullshit.

        “Would it be too much to ask, though, that you not always feel it’s a better choice to attack the person than the argument? Really? You’re suggesting that I am elevating myself “as being in a better position to voice criticism” because I have the temerity to have my own opinion. Can’t I just want to write what’s on my mind?”

        you wrote a manifesto, Don.  your argument and person are too deeply entangled in this post for me to be able to criticize the one, and not the other.  i hope you can see that.

          • according to internet sensation Rob Kailey, you most certainly cannot just write what’s on your mind on a blog with a comment thread with the expectation it won’t be seized on and used to further some other wack-job’s agenda (i’m the wack-job in this particular scenario).

            you have been (silently) supportive of those kind of tactics in the past when the target is someone else.  my tip is think about that before trying to play the victim.

          • according to internet sensation Rob Kailey, you most certainly cannot just write what’s on your mind on a blog with a comment thread with the expectation it won’t be seized on and used to further some other wack-job’s agenda (i’m the wack-job in this particular scenario).

            you have been (silently) supportive of those kind of tactics in the past when the target is someone else.  my tip is think about that before trying to play the victim.

          • Kitchen is hot I agree. But to lord over a comment thread and try to monitor people and attitudes is oppressive and controlling and worst of all, boring. You remind me of those kids in school who got their rocks by being hall monitors. Grow a set.

            • I’ll actually that as a compliment that you find my posts boring, Mark.
              Someone whose entirely posting history is badly understood, regurgitated
              Chomsky certainly knows boring.

          • Don: I have a bookshelf with four shelves and three boxes of books downstairs, and countless books I have given away since I don’t keep the ones that don’t leave a lasting impresion. Of those books, Chomsky is maybe ten, and they are boxed up.

            All of that means nothing of course, if I don’t have a critical mind. What I value is this: enormous input takes me down many roads, and as in physics, I am in search of a unified theory. But it is always a work in progress.

            This much I have accepted as settled: The two parties really are one, with the Democrats playing the part of opposition merely to prevent real opposition from forming. I was a Democrat, and found them to be mostly chiseled cynics. Their business is winning elections. There are no ideals beyond that.

            So knowing that, I am forced to face the question of why Democrats, even with faced with repeated betrayal and failure, still choose to be Democrats and worse, ridicule and demean those of us who see things differently.

            My working hypothesis right now is that you are immature and unwilling to deal with real life as it presents with enormous obstacles and frustration. Instead, you elect to be Democrats because it gives you the illusion that you are accomplishing things. It’s self-rewarding. The vitriol that you throw at people like me is a psychological phenomenon, wherein you hate most those of us who force you to look at yourselves.

            Your Chomsky remark? Put up. Too man people who have never done morethan Google Horowitz toss that kind of stuff around.

            Lizard, you can either rise up and use yours wits and brain to deal with your blogging problems, or you can whine and ban and sniffle and hope someone wipes your nose. Make yourself interesting, and when Kailey attacks, give it back as given. I’ve seen you with him. You trip over yourself to be obsequious. The only way to with him is to ignore the phony bullshit and go for the jugular. He’s vulnerable. If you try to deal with his words, he’ll screw you into a hole, as he makes no sense. Forget the words, deal with the man and the attitude.

  • “choosing to support the Democratic Party is the best way to protect our tenuous hold on many of the progressive values and policies we hold dear.”

    what bugs me about your manifesto, Don, is how you are trying to elevate yourself as being in a better position to voice criticism of the party you “love” than those you disagree with (more in terms of style and tone than content).the figurative head of the party you love, who you recently criticized for potentially offering up the sacred cow of SS to the alter of corporate greed, has spent the the entirety of his term spitting in the faces of progressives.
    so i have to ask:  how is choosing to support Obama in the next election going protect us from imperial overreach?  from corporate malfeasance?  from the destruction of habeas corpus and judicial due process? from the erosion of our civil liberties? from the environmental degradation of laxly regulated extractive industries?

    “Intelligent discontent is the mainspring of civilization. Progress is born of agitation. It is agitation or stagnation.”—Eugene Debs

    so this is the quote you took the title of your blog from.  interesting, considering your recent ridicule of the EF protestors.  did you think of this quote as you choked on patchouli and worried more about alleged littering than a tar sands pipeline?

    “Why do I generally support a party that is often far to the right of my own positions? Because in today’s political climate, on many important national and local questions, they represent the last bulwark to protect rights gained and advances made in the past 100 years. Because real human beings will suffer greatly if we further empower a Republican Party so divorced from rationality and human ethics that it would destroy a program which provides economic and health security for our elderly, legally define our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters as second class citizens, and accelerate the damage being done to our environment.”

    this is really mediocre generalizing.  yes, real human beings suffer every day.  and whistleblowers trying to make things better are less safe under a big D prez.  and illegal immigrants are being deported faster than ever, even if Obama has to send them back to the ravaged hell of Haiti.  and Bradley Manning is being tortured.  and war continues to spread (Scahill on Somalia is a depressing read).

    i don’t know how anyone can love a party that produces these results.

    “Does the Democratic Party move too slowly and too cautiously in the defense of progressive values? Does it even occasionally move against those goals? Certainly—and it’s frustrating when they do it. Should progressives fight tooth and nail to drive the party back to its roots of protecting the worker, the Constitution, and a sense of economic justice? Absolutely.But that progressives are seriously discussing working against, or even voting against Democrats, at a time when basic economic rights and the future of the country are at stake, absolutely baffles me.”

    you shouldn’t be baffled.  when the rhetoric (lies) of campaigning consistently turn into politicians doing the exact opposite, well, big surprise, people begin to stop believing their bullshit, because they are liars.  And please note, it’s not the fault of the people who point out the lies; it’s the liars.

  • Cool. I’ve been silently supportive of something? I think you’re reaching now. Just a touch.

    No victim here. Just someone eager to learn. Hell, in this thread alone, I’ve learned how to be a better writer, that it’s wrong to have an opinion about my own beliefs, and that others can tell what I silently support.

    I can’t wait for more.

    • I certainly can’t speak for you, Don, but I write my own blog for myself. The entire purpose of my blog is to express my opinions, and I personally feel that everyone that runs one should do the same. It the way we present information to ourselves that teaches us how to present it to others. I enjoy your blog immensely and even though we come at things from different points of view, I will continue to look forward to your writing. You have some unique perspectives I will never have, for instance on education. Thank you for sharing your opinions with us all.

    • i never said it’s wrong to have an opinion.  do you think it’s wrong to be critical of this post?  if so, i apologize for expressing my opinion.

      i’ll let you get back to not worrying and loving the party. 

      • Since nothing anyone ever says to you has an actual impact, I’ll pass on a last thought.

        It’s completely legitimate for people to use pseudonyms when they blog–when those pseudonyms are used to criticize people and institutions in  power. I have no problem with jhwygirl or MTCowgirl doing that.

        When a pseudonym is used to personally attack people, it’s just cowardice. I’ve gotten a relatively minor dose of it in the past few months, since I dared to disagree with a post at 4and20, but you do it all the time.

        Use your name when you do it. I think that’s fair.

          • jesus Don, is that all you have left, calling me a Marxist?  i’m not, by the way, but that’s beside the point.

            oh, and i was just personally attacked by LK.  are you gonna let that stand, or is it ok to attack people you don’t agree with?

            but the attacks are something i’ve gotten use to, probably because i’ve been attacked from day one posting at 4&20.  i have often responded to those attacks in ways i’m not proud of, which is what i’m assuming you are referring to when you state that i attack people all the time.

            i’ve asked you for a little consistency in your condemnation of personal attacks by applying your standards to Rob.  you continue to refuse to do so.  

            until you do so, your criticism of me reeks of hypocrisy.  

            • You’re right, My comment actually suggested something I didn’t intend. I
              didn’t mean to suggest you were a Marxist–not that there is anything wrong
              with that, really. That’s what happens when one makes an intemperate remark.

              I made an effort to reach out to you via back channel. That’s it for me.
              You’re welcome to comment away, if you feel like it, but I’m done engaging
              in comments.

              There are more productive ways for me to spend my time, and I don’t mean
              that as a slight to you or anyone else. It’s just not a productive choice
              for me.

      • Lizzard, what are you, about 22?!  Dude, you’ve got NO sense of history.  That’s why you come off as a quixotic fool/tool.  You’re embarrassing yourself.  Name ONE thing in your life that you’ve done that’s real.  And sorry, workin’ at Micky D’s doesn’t count.  You’re easy to spot as a phony.  You’ve got NUTHIN’ invested in your high horse opinions.  You sound a lot like you graduated from the kohler school of bullshit.  ONE!  That’s all I ask.  One thing that you did that was real!

          • No.  I want something REAL!  What have your risked?  What have you invested?   What have you LIVED?   You come across as sophomoric.  I don’t say that as an insult, but to caution you that SOMEtimes, folks with a few more miles on them have a little better perspective on the situation.  Hell, even a good conservative knows this.  Wm. Buckley told his son to get his ass out and join the merchant marine and get some EXPERIENCE in life before spouting too much.  Go work in a coal mine for a couple’a years and get back with me.  In other words. LIFE!

          • wow.  ok, LK, that’s some great advice.  nothing i say has any validity until i work in a coal mine, or something else that is REAL.  you’re shooting blanks, dude.  but keep trying.  i’m sure Don won’t mind how much you ridicule me in his comment thread.

          • Holy moley! A man who litters his comments with exclamation points and CAPS and gives juvenile nicknames to people he doesn’t like; who seems shallower than a parking lot puddle and is a stranger to facts and logic … Is calling someone sophomoric.

            It’s miller time.

          • I’m sorry, mark.   Did you say something?  I wasn’t paying attention.  Would you mind repeating it?  I’m sure you’re used to that by now.

  • I’m not an elegant writer or a deep philsopher, but I do recognize good writing and statements of principle when I see them. I agree with Pogie’s post. My family roots are in European Socialism, so becoming Democrats meant my anscestors made a turn towards the right. As an institution, the Democratic Party isn’t perfect — but imagine if we’d have had more Democrats in the legislature than Republians this last session. Would have made all the difference in the world.

  • I don’t think you have the courage not to vote for a Democrat. That’s the problem. You don’t hold them accountable. Tester has gotten away with his crap because he knows you’re like a puppy following him home.

    The American political system is corrupt and probably beyond repair because it cannot be fixed from within. What progressives try to explain to you, and which simply does not sink in, is that due yo your perception that the Democrats are the lesser evil, the Democrats can get away with things that Republicans cannot. They don’t “occasionally disappoint.” They achieve great things for the owning class that Republicans cannot. Burns could not privatize our wild lands, but Tester can. Bush could not bring down SS and Medicare, but Obama can, and is trying hard to do so.

    The answer is not to vote for Republicans. There probably is no answer, and I think that is what scares people most: the idea that we have no good choices, and so have to adopt a bunker mentality and just fight a good fight and hope for progress that might not happen in our lifetimes.

    And that takes optimism of spirit, a willingness to fight and suffer for future generations. Debs had that remarkable spirit, even sitting in prison for his beliefs. Do you? Do ya, punk?

    • If electoral politics are futile or counterproductive to some grand end you envision, what do you suggest we do in 2012?  Not vote at all?  Protest in the streets so we can sit in jail as Debs did? 

      You say “there probably is no answer,” but I’m not sure what the question is.

      Aren’t you simply irrelevant?

      • That’s it in a nutshell. I said that you can’t handle that idea, that electoral politics are futile, and you wanted to know what I’m going to do in 2012! Not vote? How dare I!

        Where voting makes a difference, I vote. I voted against our corporate Democrat senator (Bennet) the the primary last year, and when he won, I did not vote in the general. There were down ticket races where I felt there were important differences, and I did vote in those races.

        Of all of our responsibilities as vigilant citizens, voting matters least. People vote in Cuba, Iraq, Iran, Mexico, to no avail. Voting does seem to have more impact in parliamentary democracies, but in the US, the same power sits behind both parties, so that as we have seen, even the massive shift in 2008 changed nothing. It’s no different in Iran except that the real power there are called Mullahs, while here they are called financiers.

        Shall I just close my eyes and pretend I matter, as you seem to be doing? There are other ways to make a difference, but nothing changes in this country until we adopt public financing of campaigns, open the door to second parties, and guess what – The Party will now stand for that.

        It requires enough strength to stare at futility and not lose hope. Do you have that in you? Do you have the guts to not vote when there are no choices? Do ya?

          • You are afraid not to vote for a Democrat. They know this and have carte blanc to do as they please. You are the problem.

            Then other part is that Republicans can go “boogalooaloo” and scare the shit out of you.

            Good cop bad cop. Works every time..

        • Actually, Mark, even where elected leaders lack absolute power (like in the US, where they are still beholden to other official and unofficial power holders), elections make a difference.  Look at the difference in Iran between Khatami being president, and Ahmadinejad being being president. If it didn’t make a difference, the regime wouldn’t have worked so hard to keep Ahmadinejad in power.  Similarly, if Democrats were equivalent to Republicans, those with money and power wouldn’t work nearly so hard to keep Republicans in a position where they can obstruct progress.   

          • Iran’s elections were subject to massive outside interference with the US using a $400 million slush fund to undermine results, generate twitters, pay agents provocateur, etc. Iran felt it was under attack with Khatami perhaps being a Manchurian candidate, perhaps the Shah reincarnate. That doesn’t clean up their elections or defeat my point, that when the same people are behind both parties, the results do ‘t matter. If you cannot look at US foreign and domestic policy and see that nothing has changed, you’re not looking hard.

            Reminds me, Greenwald write today about a Scahill Nation Mag article where he has uncovered secret CIA prisons in Somalia where rendition people are taken and tortured. Hope and change indeed! Obama is a con man.

  • Im not surprised that Gov. Schweitzer abruptly pulled out of the joint spill command center, and immediately began publicly attacking the EPA-led cleanup effort. An EPA spokesman “said Gov. Schweitzer’s decision to leave the joint command was the first time he learned of the governor’s concerns,” according to news reports. Since pulling out, he’s engaged in round the clock criticisms of the EPA-led clean-up effort.

  • perhaps 4 & 20 blackbirds is more in line with the thinking of the majority of the american people than party adherists want you to know….  http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/23/unfavorable-ratings-for-both-major-parties-near-record-highs/

    • I suspect that we’d agree that the majority of the public does agree with the need to make the super rich pay more taxes, to end the wars we’re throwing money into, and to protect social services for the most vulnerable.

      Right now, I just don’t know how/if we can make those priorities happen, and that’s pretty disheartening.

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