Denny Rehberg Votes Against 9/11 Heroes

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Dennis Rehberg still really hates the first responders who risked their lives to save others during those frantic days after the fall of the Twin Towers. A few months ago, I highlighted a vote that Representative Rehberg made, denying additional health coverage to those first responders even though the bill would not have added one nickel to the federal deficit.

Well, once again Representative Rehberg has taken the principled stand that the profits of a small sector of foreign-owned businesses are more important that the health of heroes who sacrificed their health for the greater good. Rehberg voted against the bill, even though it passed unanimously in the Senate and only sixty members of the House voted ‘no.’

It’s even worse this time. Not only did the Senate reduce the benefits in the bill, but it actually will reduce the deficit and puts pressure on foreign nations to accept business from American firms, as the bill raises money from placing a small penalty on foreign firms whose home nations restrict US business:

The
new version adds a 2% fee on federal contracts for foreign companies
whose nations bar U.S. firms from their government contracts. That would
raise $4.5 billion.

The deal would also extend fees on work visas for companies that
outsource jobs and extend a travel tourism visa fee for the rest of the
money. Both of those fees passed the Senate easily last year. Some extra
cash also would go to cutting the federal deficit.

Rehberg has had no trouble helping to run up enormous debt in two wars and to provide endless tax cuts for businesses, but couldn’t find it in his heart to vote for a bill that Senator Coburn supported? Couldn’t vote for a bill that reduced the deficit while providing that health care?

Rehberg’s not principled; he’s an embarrassment.

When confronted about his decision to sue the City of Billings and its firefighters, Rehhberg told them that “it wasn’t about them.” That decision, and the decision to vote against first responders who risked their lives after a terrorist attack on the United States makes it perfectly clear that it’s not about them–or us–unless you happen to be a foreign multinational corporation or his “ranch.”

About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is a eighteen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it’s a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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