Montana Politics

Bill Kennedy and Denny Rehberg: A Clear Choice for Children’s Health Care

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Representative Rehberg (R-White House):

U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg on Wednesday voted against a
House Democrats bill to expand the Children's Health Insurance
Program, saying it's based on an "extremist political ideology" to
expand government-run health care.

Rehberg, a Republican and Montana's only
U.S. House member, said he supports CHIP but cannot support the
Democrats' bill.

"They (Democrats) are pushing forward an
agenda of eliminating affordable, reliable health insurance from
private providers and shifting to an inefficient, costly,
government-run health care plan," he said in a prepared statement
late Wednesday.

Future Representative Kennedy (D-Montana):

Montana’s families deserve better! With the
average cost of a family health plan in Montana reaching $8,000 a
year, fewer than half of all employers in the state offer health
coverage. Many families can’t afford to buy coverage on their
own. It’s time for real solutions. The bottom line is this:
SCHIP sought to help uninsured children, and Denny Rehberg voted
no.

Montana’s working families deserve
to be treated better than just the same old Washington rhetoric.

Bill Kennedy believes that children should have easy, affordable
access to health care. Dennis Rehberg, who is the beneficiary of an
essentially free health care plan that allows unlimited doctor
visits and requires no deductibles for his entire family, paid for
by your dollars, believes that it's "extremist" for the the
government to provide care for children. That's because he's
never had to face a sick child and tell them they can't go to the
doctor.

Extremist to believe that the richest society in the history of the
world can't help children receive regular medical care? That shows
just how far out of touch Rehberg is.


About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is a seventeen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it's a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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