Montana Politics

Republicans Fail to Support the Troops

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The majority of Republicans in the Senate
and Joe Lieberman (if there is a difference) should be deeply
ashamed of themselves today. Presented with an opportunity to vote for adequate rest for soldiers serving
in Iraq and Afghanistan, they voted no, guaranteeing that the men
and women who are fighting in this war rather than just talking
about it while hiding in Washington or the Green Zone, will
continue to be pushed to the breaking point.

The cynical endgame of the Bush Administration is clear. They will
keep American troops in Iraq until 2008, leaving the debacle for
the next President. The presence of American troops in the interim
will decrease, though not eliminate, the chaos in Iraq for another
year at the cost of hundreds of American lives and billions of
dollars. When the next President brings the troops home and Iraq
collapses into war, Bush and his necon cronies will blame the next
President, despite having been the ones who created this
inevitability. The Fox News mouthbreathers who still believe that
Saddam Hussein attacked America on 9/11will believe that the next
President caused the collapse, and President Bush will try to
escape the verdict of history.

Privately, I suspect a number of the people who keep voting for the
President’s agenda in Iraq know that the war is lost. Lost not due
to the failure of our soldiers, but the failures of the people
entrusted to lead them. Each vote they cast to prolong the war or
hurt the soldiers is a shameful failure of partisanship over
leadership, and history should remember these enablers will a badge
of shame.

It’s time for Republican men and women in the Senate to act like
people of conscience. It’s too late for Joe Lieberman, but perhaps
not the rest.

About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is a seventeen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it's a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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