President Bush Sends More Wounded Troops to War

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Salon has more details about soldiers being forced back into action in Iraq, despite medical conditions ranging from physical disability to dangerous PTSD. Hunter Smart, an Army captain describes his experience and his reaction to it:

Smart fought against his redeployment, using the resources available to him as an officer to carefully shepherd his medical retirement papers through the Army bureaucracy just in time. But the experience left him worried about injured enlisted soldiers who were not so lucky — and left him furious at those in charge. Military commanders "could care less about the soldier's physical and mental welfare, as long as they can shoot straight," Smart said. "Our military is stretched to its breaking point," he added. "Commanders are being backed into a corner in order to produce units that on paper are ready to deploy. They are casting the moral and ethical implications — and soldiers — to the side."

Stories like those of Captain Smart and others profiled in the piece are more evidence of the reckless disregard for the health of soldiers and the military as a whole demonstrated by the Bush administration. While the President piously pretends to "reflect on the sacrifice that our military and their families are making," he has underfunded, under-prepared, and over-committed our forces in a criminally negligent fashion, all the while impugning the character and patriotism of those who speak against this senseless war.

After his PR visit to church, President Bush went home to his ranch to reflect more on the sacrifices made by Americans for the sake of his war:

Back at the Crawford ranch, the Easter menu included fire-glazed ham, green chili cheese grits souffle, roasted orange molasses sweet potatoes, roasted asparagus, coconut cake and ice cream.


About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is a seventeen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it's a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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