US Politics

Michelle Malkin: The Worst Person in America?

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Perhaps the most insane woman in the United States with a national forum, Michelle Malkin, offers this insight:

I can’t imagine Army Spc. Casey Sheehan would stand for his mother’s crazy accusations that he was murdered by his commander-in-chief, rather than the Iraqi terrorists who ambushed his convoy. I can’t imagine Army Spc. Casey Sheehan would stand for a bunch of strangers glomming onto his mother’s crusade and using him to undermine the war effort as they shouted “W killed her son” in front of countless TV cameras…

It’s a sad spectacle. President Bush should continue to treat Mrs. Sheehan with the same compassion and sympathy he showed her when they first met–before her heart and mind were poisoned by the professional grievance-mongers who claim to be her friends.

It must be comforting to read the mind of a dead man, to know him better than his mother, and to support a war that you (and your privileged friends) have no chance of dying in. It must be comforting to be able to sleep nights knowing that a war that is getting worse for American soliders and Iraqi people every day is somehow justified in neo-con fantasies.

And Bush’s compassion?

Not enough for wounded Iraq War veteran Terry Rodgers, who refused to meet with the man he believes is letting American soldies die for his ego.

And not so much for the compassion, really. A compassionate person might have known that Casey was Mrs. Sheehan’s son when offering false condolences.

In Ms. Sheehan’s telling, though, Mr. Bush did not know her son’s name when she and her family met with him in June 2004 at Fort Lewis. Mr. Bush, she said, acted as if he were at a party and behaved disrespectfully toward her by referring to her as “Mom” throughout the meeting.

By Ms. Sheehan’s account, Mr. Bush said to her that he could not imagine losing a loved one like an aunt or uncle or cousin. Ms. Sheehan said she broke in and told Mr. Bush that Casey was her son, and that she thought he could imagine what it would be like since he has two daughters and that he should think about what it would be like sending them off to war.

“I said, ‘Trust me, you don’t want to go there’,” Ms. Sheehan said, recounting her exchange with the president. “He said, ‘You’re right, I don’t.’ I said, ‘Well, thanks for putting me there.’ ”

About the author

Don Pogreba

Don Pogreba is a seventeen-year teacher of English, former debate coach, and loyal, if often sad, fan of the San Diego Padres and Portland Timbers. He spends far too many hours of his life working at school and on his small business, Big Sky Debate.

His work has appeared in Politico and Rewire.

In the past few years, travel has become a priority, whether it's a road trip to some little town in Montana or a museum of culture in Ísafjörður, Iceland.

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